study weekend

Members are invited to join Sante Roshi for a weekend of philosophical discussion around the theme: What does the word freedom mean in a Buddhist context? And how does it relate to liberation and enlightenment? Spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Book online through the members' pages of zazen.se


Summer Retreat

The annual summer retreat is coming up (9 to 16 June) and will be led by Sante Roshi. The schedule is less intense and the format more flexible than sesshin. Members on their first retreat should apply for the starting day plus the number of additional days they want. Others may apply for to come and leave on any day, though pickup/drop off is only offered on Monday and Wednesday. Please apply by 11 May.


Beginners' retreat in Swedish

This 4-day retreat will be led by Sante Roshi. It will be in Swedish and is suitable for both beginners and those who wish to refresh their practice. Places are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Please email if you would like more information or an application form.


Beginners' retreat

This retreat runs from 20 to 24 July and will be led by Kanja Roshi. It is suitable for both beginners and those who wish to refresh their practice. Applications are accepted on a first-come, first served basis. Please email if you would like an application form, or more information.


Welcome! Zengården is a Zen Buddhist retreat centre and full-time Zen training temple located in rural Sweden two hours west of Stockholm. Beginners and experienced practitioners alike can come here to learn and practise zazen (Zen meditation), participate in retreats and experience Zen training under the guidance of fully qualified Zen teachers. Because people from all over the world come here, instruction is given in English.

What is Zen?

The word Zen comes from the Sanskrit word "dhyana" which means concentration and absorption. In other words, meditation. The central aspect of Zen practice is sitting meditation, or “zazen”. In zazen, we gradually train our minds to be more attentive and present. The mind also learns to function in a new way, to let go of old habits, ideas and views about the world, and to be fully present, letting everything be born again in each moment.

Through the practice of zazen, we can break through our illusions and see reality as it truly is, beyond all concepts.

In Zen we say that everything is practice and that practice can be done in any situation, that you should not be stuck in, or cling to, the notion of zazen being the only way to practise. On the other hand, we should not fool ourselves into thinking that a strong sitting practice is not needed in Zen. But it is in our daily life that we bring the practice to fruition, through attending to each moment and being aware of our responsibility for the world and its inhabitants.

The relationship between the teacher and the student is an essential element of Zen practice. The teacher guides students along the path using both one-on-one instruction (in Japanese, dokusan) and lectures given to the student group (in Japanese, teisho).

Zen has always been influenced by, and adapted to, the culture and the circumstances of each new country in which it has appeared. Modern western Zen for example, has witnessed women coming to play a much more prominent role both as students and teachers than was possible in ancient Asian cultures. But the Zen that is practised here in the west also has deep roots in the Chinese and Japanese Zen traditions, and the essence of Zen is beyond both time and culture.

Zengården   |   e-mail: enquiries@zentraining.org   |   phone: +46 (0) 76 1495374, +46 (0) 72 2257631